Possessive Adjectives and Clothing Items

I am teaching possessive pronouns and clothing items. After being exposed to the vocabulary and the pronouns MY, YOUR, HIS and HER and after practicing for some time, I proposed the following task:

img_2987

Students first drew a slip with a piece of clothing each. They drew and colored their piece of clothing and in the end, we all sat on the floor.

Task 1: Each student talked about their drawing: “My dress is red”, “My boots are green”, “My socks are blue”, My shorts are blue”, My hat is pink”, My T-shirt is gray”, My shoes are green and brown”


Task 2: Then, we practiced questions and answers. I asked “What color are Julia´s shoes?” and they answered “HER shoes are green.”


Task 3: Finally, each one pointed at all the drawings and said: “Her shoes are green, his T-shirt is gray, her dress is red, his sneakers are yellow, her pants are red, his boots are green, her hat is pink , his socks are blue and my shorts are blue.”

What’s the weather like today?

Here´s a very simple activity to practice questions and answers using weather vocabulary. First, students draw and color on a small piece of paper one type of weather.

Then, write prompts on the board: What´s the weather like today? It´s …

After that, they are instructed to do the following: They all stand up. Student A will ask Student B a question about the picture they (Student A) have in their hands. Student B answers the question and asks a question about the picture they (Student B) have  in their hands. After they finish asking and answering each other a question, they exchange their slips and go find another peer to ask a different question (a question about the new slip they have in hands.) They will continue doing it until they have talked to every one. The last person they will talk to will be the one who has their drawing in hands, so they can get it back and keep it.

 

What does your dad do

My students were learning names of jobs and what people do, for instance, a police officer keeps our community safe, a firefighter puts out fires, a taxi driver drives around town, etc. They also learned to describe their parents´ schedule. After a few classes and significant practice on the topic, we wrapped this lesson up with a writing task in which they wrote about their parents. We used an app called CHATTER PIX, which allows users to add a voice to a picture. No need to mention they had a blast! Check out our video.

OPTION 2: Students draw themselves in the clothes of the professional they want to become when they grow up and write about it. They can explain their choice by using a reason or an adjective.

Examples:

1) When I grow up, I want to be a doctor because I want to help sick people.
2) I want to be a vet because I love animals and I want to help sick animals.
3) I want to be an architect because I think it´s interesting/fun/lucrative.

In the end, they record their text by using CHATTER PIX.

Tip: Allow students to practice reading their text before recording it, so you can correct any pronunciation difficulties they may have.

Draw your vacation

This is an opportunity for students to learn personal information about the teacher. The ultimate goal is to engage students into writing and make them familiar with simple writing techniques. Show students drawings of your last vacation. Don’t worry if you don’t draw well. The fact that you drew them will encourage your students to do the same. Also, show short simple sentences for each drawing. Make sure, students identify and understand the three parts of a paragraph:

1) TOPIC SENTENCE: It tells you what the paragraph will be about;
2) BODY: It is developed around the topic sentence usually with examples and details;
3) CONCLUSION: It restates the introduction with different words.

Also, make sure students are familiar with “connectors”. After showing your students your sentences, allow them some time to draw and write about their own vacation. Have colored pencils and blank sheets of paper available on your desk in case they don´t have those. You can also assign this task for homework. At home, they will scan and upload their drawings and write about them. They can make a video or a power point slide presentation to show in the following class.

Elections 2014

Last october, Brazilians voted for president and unlike previous elections, this one was marked by  fierce and really nasty comments of the candidates about their opponents’ character. Instead of talking about their platform, they attacked each other trying to make them look unreliable to the voters (which explains the opening remark in the video). Thus,  I took this opportunity to assign a project for my teen students. Since they were learning the first conditional, they were supposed to pretend they were running for president and create a political platform in which they stated what they would do in case they won. They were supposed to use the possible starters below:

1) If you vote for me, I will… 2) If I win this election, I will… 3) If I have your vote/ support, I will… 4) If you give me a chance, I will…

When they finished writing their platforms, I proofread them and provided them with comments and suggestions. After that, the students used the school’s IPads to design a poster, in which they would draw a symbol for their campaign, think of an “imaginary” party/number and come up with a catch phrase. The drawing app they used was DRAWP because it’s super user friendly.

Once their posters were done, we filmed their platforms. I projected their posters on the data show screen and they read their material. I suggest that they practice for awhile before recording the video. (However, as much as they rehearse, they will always mispronounce one, two or some of the words. Believe me, I’ve tried. As much as I recorded them again, a new mispronunciation occurred. Inspite of that, they consolidated the structure, which  was a big deal). The videos are time consuming, therefore, I suggest that you assign this project to only one group of few students. I had 8 students In this class.

To wrap things up, we had an election in school. We set up a room with the video on, a ballot and voting slips displayed on a desk. Everyone going past the room was invited to go inside, watch the video and vote for one of the candidates.

In the end, the winner got a token.

How old are you?

Super simple activity for practicing HOW OLD ARE YOU? with elementary students. I usually draw first to demonstrate what I expect from them.

 Teacher’s                                   Student’s

1) Write the following on the board:

HOW OLD ARE YOU? I´m___________.

2) Hand out sheets in blank;
3) Students draw and color their age (They draw a big number in the center of the sheet)
4) Students tape them to their chest;
5) Students walk around the classroom and practice Q/A; (They will continue until they have talked to every one)

Happy Birthday!

After being introduced to vocabulary related to birthdays (gifts, party, cake, balloons, and names of toys) my students also learned to congratulate someone for their birthday and how to ask Yes/No questions with the verb TO BE.

Student 1: Happy Birthday!
Student 2: Thanks.
Student 1: This is for you. (a gift)
Student 2: Thank you very much! Is it a …….?
Student 1: Yes, it is.

Student 1: Happy Birthday!
Student 2: Thanks.
Student 1: This is for you. (a gift)
Student 2: Thank you very much! Is it a …….
Student 1: No, it isn’t. It’s a ………

After being presented to the dialog and practicing for a while, my students were given a sheet in blank.
1) They folded their sheet in two.
2) They drew and colored ( ON THE INSIDE) a gift they would like to get for their birthday or a gift they have received for their birthday.
3) Then, they drew a gift like picture ON THE OUTSIDE of the paper. (wrapping paper patterned and a ribbon)
4) Monitor students, so you have an idea of the gifts there are because later on, they will exchange their gifts. Thus, it’s important to mentally arrange them in pairs in a way everyone receives an appropriate gift.

5) After that, I chose the pairs and called them out and two by two, they acted out the conversation above and exchanged their gifts. Remember that during the dialog, they have to guess what the gift is by asking “Is it a ….?” In case the student doesn’t guess it at all, you can encourage students to ask “What is it?” In my class, there was one student alone, so I participated by drawing one gift myself. During the dialog, students exchanged their gifts and sat down
6) In the end, they glued their gift drawing to their notebooks and wrote a thank you letter.